Cinebanter

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Sunday, April 18, 2010

Cinebanter #87 - THE CONVERSATION

The mp3 of this show can be found here.









In this episode, Michael and Tassoula listen in on THE CONVERSATION, a classic film from Francis Ford Coppola. They also deliver their Last Five® and respond to the "Ladies Edition" of Listener Last Fives. The breakdown is as follows:

• 00:00 Intro
• 00:32 Discussion of THE CONVERSATION
• Break
• 19:50 To Sum It Up
• Break
• 20:24 The Last Five®
• Break
• 54:40 Listener Last Five® Ladies Edition (Laura in Brooklyn and Eileen in Berkeley)
• 1:10:57 Credits & Outtakes

Michael's Last Five® in this episode were: F**K: A DOCUMENTARY, JULIE & JULIA, THE JONESES, THE FIRST YEAR and LET THE RIGHT ONE IN. Tassoula's were: NURSERY UNIVERSITY, BRIEF CONVERSATIONS WITH HIDEOUS MEN, HIGH FIDELITY, FIVE MINUTES OF HEAVEN and 13 CONVERSATIONS ABOUT ONE THING.

If you'd like to subscribe to the show (it's free, of course) via iTunes, click here. Please leave comments if you like what you hear.

Want to donate to the show and help with production costs, server fees, etc.? Click on the "Make a Donation" button to the left of this blog.

Special thanks to Brad Daane and Mark Cummins for providing the original music in this episode.

Tassoula has reviews, musings and movie-related product links at Tassoula's Movie Review Blog.

Reviews and/or notes of every movie Michael sees can be found at his MichaelVox website.

Feedback is always welcome - you may leave comments here or e-mail the hosts at cinebanter@gmail.com.

We hope you enjoy the show!

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2 Comments:

Anonymous Nathan, Lincoln NE said...

I’m glad Tassoula had a chance to see Five Minutes of Heaven, one of my favorite films of 2009. It’s interesting that she used the word “disappointment,” because the film actually evoked the same emotion in me—and as peculiar as this may sound, that’s precisely why I liked the film as much as I did.

During the first half of Five Minutes of Heaven, we’re led to empathize with the victim. By the time the victim has the chance to enact revenge, we want to see it play out, whether it be out of curiosity or perhaps something more primordial. When it doesn’t go according to plan, we’re left feeling profoundly disappointed—and perhaps guilty for wanting to see this murder take place. Rarely does a film affect me in such a direct, emotional way.

As time progresses throughout the movie, we’re made increasingly aware of the perpetrator’s own guilt. We realize that nothing but futility could come of violence against an individual with such deep remorse—but the victim can’t or perhaps won’t see it.

It took me many years to fully accept the futility of resentment. Five Minutes of Heaven comes to this conclusion in less than two hours, detailing the complex issues surrounding the notions of guilt, remorse, and resentment in the process. This is why I thought it was a superbly crafted film and was one of my favorites of last year.

By the way, I forgot to mention this last week: I'm 29 and I've never owned an answering machine--nor a landline phone, for that matter. And although I disagreed with Tassoula on Five Minutes of Heaven, I agreed with her wholeheartedly on Hot Tub Time Machine: The scatalogical humor was just too much for me.

7:31 PM  
Anonymous paul said...

The movie Dr Vox refers to is Let Him Have It http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0102288/which tells the true story of Derek Bentley, a mentally disabled man who was hanged in England in the 1950s for his part in the murder of a policeman during a robbery.
Also Michael no less than Steve Metcalf of Slate's Culture Gabfest endorses Let The Right One In this week, so you're not the last to see it. Terrific film, one of the best of 2009, glad you enjoyed as much as i did!

3:44 AM  

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